Water Plant

           

 Water Plant

              Meet the increased water demands of a growing population and minimize water scarcity issues. Treat challenging source water while meeting or exceeding regulatory requirements, deliver high performance water purification at the lowest life-cycle costs Address your water needs within your current plant footprint.

             Drinking water are treated by public or private water utilities to make the water potable (safe to drink) and palatable (aesthetically pleasing) and to ensure an adequate supply of water to meet the needs of the community at a reasonable cost. Except in exceedingly rare instances, the entire supply is treated to drinking water quality for three reasons: it is generally not feasible to supply water of more than one quality; it is difficult to control public access to water not treated to drinking water quality; and a substantial amount of treatment may be required even if the water is not intended for human consumption. All surface waters have the potential to carry pathogenic (disease-causing) microorganisms and must be disinfected prior to human consumption. Since the adequacy of disinfection cannot be assured in the presence of turbidity, it is first necessary to remove the suspended solids causing the water to be turbid. This is accomplished by a sequence of treatment processes that typically includes coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation, and filtration. Coagulation is accomplished by adding chemical coagulants, usually aluminum or iron salts, to neutralize the negative charge on the surfaces of the particles (suspended solids) present in the water, thereby eliminating the repulsive forces between the particles and enabling them to aggregate. Coagulants are usually dispersed in the water by rapid mixing.